A COMPILATION OF MEDICAL/HEALTH STUDIES ON THE

RED PALM OIL

Bioavailability and composition of Red Palm Oil

The bio-availability of red palm oil is higher than other vegetable sources.
You C.S., et al. (2001), “Bioavailability and vitamin A value of carotenes from red palm oil assessed by an extrinsic isotope reference method”, Proceedings of Food Technology & Nutrition Conference, International Palm Oil Congress 2001, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Commercial CAROTINO red palm oil contains no less than 500ppm carotene and 800ppm vitamin E.
Nagendran b. et al., (2000), “Characteristics of red palm oil, a carotene- and vitamin E-rich refined oil for food uses”, Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Vol 21(2):189-194

The bio-availability of beta-carotenes from red palm oil and synthetic beta-carotene is similar. However, red palm oil is a better choice as it contains a bouquets of carotenoids rather than just a single type of carotene.
Van Het Hof K.H. et al. (1999), “Comparison of the bioavailability of natural palm oil carotenoids and synthetic beta-carotene in humans”, J Agric Fd Chem 47(4): 1582-1586

Atherosclerosis

Dr. David Kritchevsky of the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, US demonstrated that CAROTINO red palm oil is the least atherogenic oil compared to refined, bleached, deodorized palm oil and randomized palm oil. The anti-atherogenic attributes of red palm oil is due to the presence of abundant amounts of antioxidants, particularly the carotenoids and tocotrienols.
Kritchevsky D, et al., (2001), “Red palm oil in experimental atherosclerosis”, Proceedings of Food Technology & Nutrition Conference, International Palm Oil Congress 2001, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Improving Vitamin A and antioxidant status

A study by the National Institute of Nutrition in Hanoi, Vietnam showed that CAROTINO red palm oil supplementation could significantly improved the serum retinal and Hb levels of rural under five children in Vietnam; Hb levels of red palm oil supplementation group were as high as those given in vitamin A capsules.
Nguyen T.L. et at., (2001), “Effects of red palm oil supplementation on vitamin A and iron status of rural underfive chidren in Vietnam”, Proceedings of Food Technology & Nutrition Conference, International Palm Oil Congress 2001, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Prof.Keramat Ali of University of Dacca, Bangladesh showed that children suffering from respiratory infections and diarrhoeal diseases when given biscuits prepared using CAROTINO red palm oil, had significantly increased serum retinol levels. These children also did not have any respiratory or diarrhoeal episode during the study period.
Ali S.M.K. et al. (2001), “Beta carotene to combat acute respiratory tract infection and diarrhoea disease in slum children of Dhaka, Bangladesh”, Proceedings of Food Technology & Nutrition Conference, International Palm Oil Congress 2001, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Prof. Louis Canfield of University of Arizona at Tucson demonstrated that mothers in Honduras who consumed CAROTINO red palm oil had significant increments in their serum and milk beta and alpha carotene concentrations respectively. Infants who were breast-fed by these supplemented mothers also had significantly higher serum retinal concentrations compared to the controls.
Canfield L.M. et al., (2000) , “Red palm oil in the maternal diet improves the vitamin A status of lactating mothers and their infants”, Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Vol 21(2): 144-148

Dr. Benade and his co-workers at the Medical Research Council of South Africa experiences in using CAROTINO red palm oil convinced them that the oil is the ideal fat for Vitamin A fortification in the baking industry, as red palm oil is the richest source of natural carotenes.
Benade A.J.S. et al. (2000), “South African experience with the use of red palm oil to improve the vitamin A status of primary school children”, Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Vol 21(2):212-214

Primary school children in South Africa who consumed four pieces of the CAROTINO red palm oil biscuits per day had significantly higher levels of their serum retinol levels. The biscuits are well accepted for their tastes and appearances.
Stuijvenberg M.E. et al. (2000), “Red palm oil as a source of beta-carotene in a school biscuits used to address vitamin A deficiency in primary school children”, Inter J Fd Sc and Nutr., 51:S43-50

Dr. Georg Lietz from University of Dundee, UK showed that Tanzania pregnant women supplemented with CAROTINO red palm oil had significantly higher levels of alpha- and beta-carotene in their plasma and breast milk.
Lietz G. et al., (2000), “Use of red palm oil for promotion of maternal vitamin A status”, Food and Nutrition Bulletin, Vol 21(2):215-218